Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t

No one cares. (Correction: Most people don’t care.) That’s one of the most important things to learn as a writer or ~*~Creator of Things*~~ in general.

Some people I’ve encountered professionally have the delusion that everyone (consumers, readers, the general public) is eagerly awaiting their next creation. That people live and breathe for their next move. Especially if said move is a blog post or social media update for some company. Wrong! (Unless you tweet for Obama or blog for Taylor Swift or something.)

I firmly believe…

#1. Everyone is super-busy
#2. Everyone has a short attention span (THANX TECHNOLOGY)
#3. Creators of Things thus have to prove their Thing is worthy of time and attention; attention is earned, not splashed out freely, except for a teeny segment of hardcore fans like your mom and BFF

These are novel concepts for some people. (Ahem.)

So I was stoked to see that the dude who wrote The War of Art has a new book called Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t. YES! Thank you! I’VE BEEN TRYING TO SAY THAT.

Today, Marie Forleo linked to a free PDF of his book that you can snag within the next 48 hours. Here’s a bit I especially liked:

Nobody Wants to Read Your Shit by Steven Pressfield

Or her. Anyway, I totally agree. Time is valuable. Anyone can write long rambly stuff (see: every blog post I’ve ever written). The challenge is to write like juice concentrate, pack as much as you can into as small ‘n’ compelling a package. Something this post, er, does not do very well. There’s always next time.

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4 thoughts on “Nobody Wants to Read Your Sh*t

  1. Sabiscuit

    Loved this post, Holly. It wrote pretty much this same thing in a post about my blogging experiences and certainly feel that when I publish something, it has to be worth the reader’s time. I feel that it is important to pay attention to readers at and try to adapt to the times. If everyone’s mourning a national tragedy, I won’t publish about my beach holiday. At the same time, I feel that we need to make mistakes and learn from them. If authors they don’t arrive at the conclusion that people aren’t reading because they’re not interested in the content, it’s not that big a loss.

    1. Holly Richmond

      Thanks for this thoughtful comment!! I’m checking out your blog right now. Nice to meet ya, stranger! 🙂

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