dressing like a toddler for fun and profit

You know what’s overrated? Dressing like a grownup.

I went through a brief period of Trying To Look Professional (coinciding with a certain job). You know, blazers, flattering colors, and all that. Now that I work from home or in a casual coworking space, I’m back to Looking Like a Goddamn Hot Mess. J/k, I still try to look presentable…but in an Eccentric Glamour kind of way.

Enter DRESSING LIKE A CHILD.

Why are all the fun clothes made for kids? I swear:

SOMEone (ahem, serious fashion designers) decided women only wanted to wear olive green and navy and black and white. When REALLY some of us want to wear neon rainbows and watermelons all the time, and preferably not in polyester, thankyouverymuch. (Thankfully, Lazy Oaf and Gorman seem to realize this, though they’re pretty spendy.)

Lately, I’ve been embracing my inner child by ordering some pink cotton bike shorts to wear under mini dresses and wearing t-shirts under strappy/cleavage-y sundresses. To hell with looking chic or sophisticated! It’s not like I spend my free time slinking around jazz bars, martini in hand. More like taking long naps and running down the street to catch the bus.

Is subtlety only for the borings? Will my therapist have a field day analyzing what this means about my maturity level and comfort with my SEXUALITY and WOMANHOOD? Tune in next time! J/k, we’ll probably talk about butterscotch pudding next time. SORRRRREEEEE!

a bright, glam, maximalist capsule wardrobe

Capsule wardrobes are everywhere right now. But most of them seem to be made up of snooze-worthy neutrals: lots of black, white, and gray. Those that have “a pop of color!!!!” include, like, one navy/olive/eggplant top or scarf. PASS.

And yet I’m realizing that even though I’m a maximalist in some ways (bright colors! ruffles! asymmetry! leopard print! layers!), I don’t actually want a closetful of crappy fast fashion. I have the bizarre-o desire to save my money for quality clothing I love to death and that will last.

GASP! Is this maximal minimalism? (Minimal maximalism? Messy simplicity? Bright, uh, something?)

Inspired by my stylish frayun Kelly (of Feminist Sticker Club and Cat Sticker Club fame), I’m toying with the idea of slowly creating a capsule wardrobe…but one heavy on PINK and SHAGGY TEXTURE and SHINE:

bright pink capsule wardrobe

(Gold miniskirt: Never has it been so clear that “versatile” is subjective. THAT PINK SHAG COAT THO)

Seems like the point of a capsule wardrobe is to buy fewer, better things that delight you; wear them often; and keep them for a long time. (“Better” being a vague catchall for quality, fair-trade, eco-friendly, etc. etc.)

I, erm, basically have the opposite of a capsule wardrobe. While I typically assuage my consumer guilt by shopping at Goodwill and frequently purging stuff from my closet (thanks, Marie Kondo!), this results in a sort of CHURN ‘N’ BURN that doesn’t actually reduce my consumption. I admit it: I’m a (fashion) commitment-phobe. Novelty gives me a rush.

confessions of a shopaholic gif

Anyway, I stumbled on the blog A Small Wardrobe and LOVE these guidelines for shopping:

– Only buy things that are exactly what I want.
– Only buy things that fit perfectly.
– Only buy things of good quality.

If only everything in my wardrobe fit those guidelines!

Notice that price isn’t part of the equation. As someone who, ahem, has difficulty sticking to a budget…

confessions of a shopaholic

…I know this means I have to patiently save up for nice stuff, NOT BUY A TON OF IT ALL AT ONCE. This will involve the dreaded Delayed Gratification I’ve heard so much about. (Hrrumph.)

In any case, I’d like to think zany, bright, colorful capsule wardrobes can exist. Jenna Lyons of J.Crew claims that leopard-print is a neutral. Why not?

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in love with: house of holland

I was reading an interview with Charli XCX in Nylon (because I’m a 14-year-old girl in suburban Michigan) & saw a photo of her wearing a killer jacket (top right). Feminism in a coat! It’s by House of Holland, an expensive, amazing British designer brand for us sparkly neon jungle cats. Observe:

house of holland 2015

house of holland 2015

For now I’ll have to settle for my own version, House of Holly.

in love with: Fuco Ueda’s “Kioku No Hana” (Flower Of Memory)

On a recent trip to Powell’s, I had to grab Hi-Fructose, a contemporary art mag I’d never heard of, because of the ~*UH-MAZING EYE-POPPING COVER ART*~* by 35-year-old Japanese artist Fuco Ueda. I mean, LOOK AT THIS:

fuco-ueda-flower-of-memory-a

fuco-ueda-flower-of-memory-center

fuco-ueda-flower-of-memory-b

ALL MY FAVE COLORS IN ONE PLACE!

There’s also this:

Red Flower by Fuco Ueda
Red Flower by Fuco Ueda

And this, half Marie Antoinette and half emo:

Garden of Silence by Fuco Ueda
Garden of Silence by Fuco Ueda

Check out more of her work on Thinkspace, where she had an exhibit this spring. LUV U UEDA ❤ ❤